Psoriatic arthritis inflammation and disease progression

If you’ve been diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) but still have uncontrolled skin and joint

it might be because you have too much inflammation in your body.

In an inflammatory condition like PsA, the immune system attacks the body’s own tissues and results in increased inflammation. Over time, ongoing inflammation can

if it’s not diagnosed early and appropriately treated.

Could you have too much inflammation?

You answered "yes" to one or more questions

Talk to your doctor about the role inflammation plays in PsA symptoms and how PsA treatment options fight it. If you are diagnosed with PsA, talk to your doctor about how your current treatment plan is working for you.

You answered "no" to all three questions

It's important to keep inflammation in check, so remember to ask your rheumatologist how inflammation can play a role in your symptoms. Healthy lifestyle and diet choices can help reduce inflammation—and a Living Well Kit, packed with anti-inflammatory recipes, can get you started.

PsA is linked to more than skin and joints

Chronic inflammation from PsA has been associated with other conditions, too—like cardiovascular (heart) disease and obesity. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis also have a higher rate of incidence in patients with psoriatic arthritis, as does uveitis, an inflammatory eye disease. If any of these symptoms seem familiar, talk to your rheumatologist who may also refer you to other specialists who manage these conditions.

It’s important to remember that appropriate, effective

can help control PsA symptoms—as well as help prevent further joint damage.

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The 2018 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) Guideline for the Treatment of Psoriatic Arthritis includes updated recommendations.

 

To learn more about the guideline and recommendations, please talk to your rheumatologist.

Quick Poll

Do you see a rheumatologist to treat your PsA?

Since you answered “yes,” you might be interested in a guide to help make each appointment more effective.

Since you answered “no,” consider seeing a rheumatologist—an expert at diagnosing and treating psoriatic arthritis.

Make your next appointment more productive

Come prepared to talk to your rheumatologist with a downloadable Doctor Discussion Guide.

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Explore PsA Treatment Options

There are many different treatments for psoriatic arthritis. Talk to your rheumatologist and discuss a treatment plan that can help you achieve your personal goals, such as living with less joint pain and clearer skin.

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Get a Free Kit with Recipes and More

Sign up to get a helpful resource with recipes, tips, symptom tracker, and more to help you fight PsA.

Sources: 1. Gottlieb A, Merola JF. Psoriatic arthritis for dermatologists. J Dermatolog Treat. 2019;1-18. doi: 10.1080/09546634.2019.1605142. 2. Psoriatic arthritis. American College of Rheumatology. Updated March 2019. Accessed August 10, 2020. https://www.rheumatology.org/I-Am-A/Patient-Caregiver/Diseases-Conditions/Psoriatic-Arthritis.

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